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About theMuse

The Civil War MuseHello! I'm The Civil War Muse (aka, theMuse). I wanted to tell you a little bit about myself.

I recently retired after a 26-year career as an Information Technology professional. For many years I developed and taught training courses in advanced software engineering techniques. I found that I was good at explaining complex things in a way that could be understood by many people.

I live in the greater Kansas City metropolitan area and the Missouri-Kansas border was a hotbed of activity around the time of the American Civil War. I see myself applying my training skills to historical events with an emphasis on the events that took place before and during the America Civil War in Missouri and Kansas.

I hope that you will enjoy this website as much as I plan to enjoy creating content for it. I am keenly interested in the history of the United States of America, particularly the American Civil War. You might say that I am a "born again" history nut. But make no mistake, I am an amateur historian. I will always do my best to get the facts right, but my opinion will also be here. And I will make it interesting.

I am sure many of you are familiar with the old adage that history is written by the winners. This definitely applies to the American Civil War. It is especially true regarding the public perception of the events along the Missouri-Kansas border. Many people are familiar with the story of how William Quantrill led a raid on Lawrence, Kansas that resulted in the massacre of hundreds of Kansans. Far fewer people are familiar with the raiding led by Charles Jennison and James Lane that resulted in the deaths of many Missourians.

I want to provide a fair and balanced account of these historical events. Just like everyone else, I am persuaded by one argument but not another. So, of course, my writings will contain those points of view that I find compelling.

Something with which many will take issue is the fact that I do not provide detailed footnotes in my articles. As a layman, I often find footnotes distracting when I read historical accounts. I fully understand their purpose, but have chosen not to use them. I will continue to "hide" behind my amateur status when it comes to footnotes. I will provide a list of the references that I have used in creating my articles. That will have to suffice.



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